Master Chief, et al, 

     Sadly, I wasn't able to copy 8574 kHz from Maine today. I had both my Kenwood transceiver with vertical antenna and my Drake R8 receiver with dipole antenna doing double duty scouring the airwaves for signals. I had a very faint copy on 17314 kHz with the voice broadcast. I certainly was able to hear both KPH and KFS on 17 MHz sending out their call tapes. Additionally, I actually managed to hear a watery "NRV" SITOR marker on 16 MHz. That was very unexpected, but timely considering the circumstances. 
     So with a tear in my eye, I have to shed my "Chief Sparks" insignia. The "Sparks" were always a source of pride with me. Before the Coast Guard, my only exposure to radio was playing with a neighbor's CB radio set back in the mid-70's, as well as kiddie walkie-talkies. It wasn't until I received orders to Radioman "A" School (while striking Boswainsmate as a Seaman) that I found that I really enjoyed radio. It was also at "A" school that I picked up my Novice ham license (thanks Perry Angiono). I haven't looked back since. In 1993 I sent the final 500 kHz broadcast from NMC. I have attached a copy of that final log. Some people listed in this e-mail already have a copy. Once the CW was gone the job changed. 
     For those that don't know, Master Chief O'Banion was my "Chief" aboard the USCGC Chase/NLPM/NNN0NXY when I was a TC2. He can certainly attest to my efforts providing MARS phone patches, digital MARSGrams text messages and Winlink HF E-mail that I provided to the crew. I knew that ham radio license would come in handy one day. This was before the days that underway e-mail was commonplace aboard MEC and HEC cutters. It certainly kept me busy between watches down in radio. It was also Chief O'Banion that perked my current interest in computers. He could make Unisys "Green Screens" and PC's sing. I was certainly impressed. 
     Anyway, best wishes and a big thanks to all that were involved in this event. It was certainly memorable. 
 73 de Eric, KB6YNO/1

     THE MEMBERS OF THE MARITIME RADIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY, AS THE KEEPERS OF SAN FRANCISCO RADIO KPH, WOULD LIKE TO TAKE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO THANK THE HUNDREDS OF U.S. COAST GUARD MEN AND WOMEN WHO OVER THE YEARS, TIRELESSLY STOOD WATCH ON THE INTERNATIONAL DISTRESS AND CALLING FREQUENCY LISTENING FOR DISTRESS SIGNALS WITH THE INTENT OF PROTECTING LIFE AND PROPERTY AT SEA. WE REGRET THAT THE SPARKS INSIGNIA WILL NEVER AGAIN BE WORN ON THE RESPONSIBLE SHOULDERS OF RADIOMEN, WHO DEDICATED THEIR LIVES TO THE SAFETY OF OTHERS. IN THE TRADITION OF THE MARITIME COMMUNITY, LET US WISH YOU ALL FAIR WINDS AND FOLLOWING SEAS. 
~ ZUT/88/73 DA STOOPS

               The Last TC Class to Wear

                          "The Sparks"

Each guest invited to attend the Class 06-03 graduation ceremony on March 28, 2003 received a special invitation to the event. Here are some of the pictures we took at the graduation ceremony.

Earlier, the following message was sent by KPH, over the sine of "DA" who is also a former Coast Guard operator stationed at the old NMC:

​​CGCWOA's representative Larry Polito (ZUT-1333) congratulating SNTC Dan Williams, last person to graduate wearing the sparks

CGCWOA's representative Larry Polito addressing the group

Graduating Class plus Fred Siegel of Fred's Place

     Revving up their transmitters in CW mode, and taking their old (electronic) hand keys out of storage, operators at the old NMC (Point Reyes, California), broadcast a special commemorative message on several frequencies in the MF and HF bands.

​M.A. Hernandez holding up his ZUT card for all to see!

​Honor graduate TC3 David Robinson receiving certificate

COMMEMORATIVE CEREMONIES 
AT CAMSPAC/NMC

Type your paragraph here.

TC3 pinning for members that made it.e.

     Its been several years since the U. S. Coast Guard and the rest of the maritime services phased out the use of CW as the primary  means of wireless telecommunications, with the Coast Guard changing the Radioman (RM) rate to Telecommunications Technician (TC) along the way. But the year 2003 marked the end of the symbol people usually identified with Coast Guard personnel proficient in communicating via Morse Code —  that is, the "Sparks" on the rating badge worn by Radiomen and early TCs. Veteran CW operators who had practiced the craft were sad to see the last vestige of a special skill be replaced with the old Radarman symbol when the two rates were merged into the new Operations Specialist rate. 
     Incidentally, the U. S. Navy, in accomplishing a similar rate consolidation in 1999, kept the Sparks symbol to identify its new Information Systems Technician rate. The Navy had discontinued the routine use of CW long before the Coast Guard, but explained:"In keeping with the proud tradition of the RM rating, the rating badge of electronic sparks associated with the rating is being retained." 
     Some might argue that the Coast Guard's retirement of the Sparks was appropriate because the people holding the new rate will no longer be using CW to communicate with CG ships and stations and with other units in the maritime service and the Sparks will forever and rightfully be associated with only those who did. 
     The Coast Guard did not let the retirement of the Sparks occur without some memorable ceremonies. This included a special celebration for the last Telecommunications Technician "A School" class to graduate from Coast Guard Training Center at Petaluma, and commemorating their distinction of being the last TCs to be awarded the "Sparks." 
     And on July 1, 2003, the date all TCs were changed to the new OS rate, the Coast Guard's CAMSPAC (Communication Area Master Station Pacific), at the site of the old Primary Radio Station, NMC, configured its CW transmitters to broadcast a final message saluting "all those who have worn the Sparks. 
     The remainder of this page provides details and pictures of both of these memorable, though melancholy, events:

​​
     IN 1975 I WAS A RADIOMAN AT WHAT WAS THEN KNOWN AS COMMSTA SAN FRANCISCO, NMC. AFTER MY ENLISTMENT WAS OVER, I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BE HIRED AT KPH, WHO IS ALSO PARTICIPATING IN THE BROADCASTS TODAY AS A MUSEUM. 6 YEARS AGO, YESTERDAY, ON JUNE 30, 1997, KPH THE WIRELESS GIANT OF THE PACIFIC CLOSED ITS DOORS TO COMMERCIAL TRAFFIC. 
     TODAY WE RETIRE THE SPARKS INSIGNIA WORN BY ME BACK IN 1975, AND BY RADIOMEN AROUND THE WORLD AND IN THE U.S. COAST GUARD. 
     FOR THE OLD CHIEFS AND EX RADIOMEN WHO MIGHT BE LISTENING TODAY, I WOULD LIKE TO FIRE UP SOME MEMORIES OF WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO BE AN HF AMVER OPERATOR AT NMC. THESE PICTURES HAVE BEEN SWIRLING THROUGH MY MEMORY ALL WEEK AS I PREPARED TO WRITE THIS MESSAGE. 
     THE COMRADERIE AND COMPETITION TO BE THE BEST CW OPERATOR, WAS UNDERSCORED ONLY BY THE ENTHUSIASM TO BE RADIOMEN. OPERATORS ANXIOUSLY AWAITED OBS SKEDS, FIGHTING OVER DUTY ASSIGNMENTS, DURING WHICH WE COMPETITIVELY PERFORMED OUR CRAFT. 
      LEARNING HOW TO COPY CUT NUMBERS FROM INCREDIBLY FAST RUSSIAN OPERATORS, AND HOW TO COPY BEHIND IN ORDER TO TYPE FASTER, WERE PART OF THE JOB. I REMEMBER THE FIRST TIME I SAW AN OPERATOR SITTING AT A TYPEWRITER AND COPYING A PRESS BROADCAST FROM KPH USING ONE FINGER ON ONE HAND, SMOOTHLY MOVING FROM ONE KEY TO THE NEXT IN A EVEN RHYTHM. I HAD NO IDEA HOW I WAS EVER GOING TO GET TO THAT LEVEL OF ABILITY, BEING SOMEWHAT STUCK ON 22 WORDS PER MINUTE AS A RADIOMAN SCHOOL GRADUATE, BUT I WAS CERTAINLY MESMERIZED BY THE SKILL OF THE YOUNG MAN COPYING THE PRESS. PRESS BROADCASTS TYPICALLY WENT OUT AT AROUND 25 WPM, SOME TIMES FASTER  COMPARED TO A NORMAL WEATHER BROADCAST THAT WAS SENT AT 18 WORDS PER MINUTE, 25 WPM PRESS WAS COMMONLY COPIED BY THE STAFF FOR CODE PRACTICE.

     THE FIRST TIME I SAW SOMEONE USE A SPEEDKEY, I KNEW I HAD TO HAVE ONE. THERE WAS ONLY ONE CATCH, I WOULD HAVE TO PROVE MY PROFICIENCY  AND BE TESTED TO OBTAIN A SPEEDKEY CERTIFICATE IN ORDER TO USE ONE ON THE AIR. WITH A LITTLE PRACTICE I DID EARN THAT CERTIFICATE, AND EVENTUALLY WENT ON TO OWN MY OWN SPEEDKEY, WHICH IS A CHROME PLATED ORIGINAL DELUXE VIBROPLEX, THAT I STILL USE TODAY. 
     BEGINNING AS A RADIOMAN IN THE U.S. COAST GUARD PREPARED ME FOR MY CAREER AS A COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATOR, AND IT GIVES ME GREAT PLEASURE TO BE HERE TODAY TO SEE THE SPARKS INSIGNIA THAT I ONCE WORE, BEING COMMEMORATED AND REMEMBERED WITH THE RESPECT AND REVERENCE IT DESERVES. FROM THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC, TO THE DAWN OF THE SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS AGE, THE RADIOMAN HAS STOOD HIS WATCH AND LISTENED TO THE MUSIC OF MORSE WITH DEDICATION AND EXPERTISE KNOWN ONLY BY HIS FELLOW OPERATORS. WHETHER AT SEA OR ASHORE, THEIR JOB WAS THE SAME, TO PROTECT LIFE AND PROPERTY AT SEA WITH RELIABLE COMMUNICATIONS. 

I AM PROUD TO HAVE WORN THE SPARKS INSIGNIA, AND IT IS WITH A SAD HEART THAT WE RETIRE THAT EMBLEM OF PROFICIENCY TODAY. NMC AND KPH , BESIDES BEING PHYSICAL NEIGHBORS, HAVE WORKED WELL TOGETHER THROUGH THE YEARS, AND THE MEMBERS OF THE MRHS THANK NMC FOR INCLUDING US IN THE CEREMONY TODAY. IN THE TRADITION OF THE MARITIME COMMUNINTY, WE WISH THE COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS OF TODAY AND TOMORROW, FAIR WINDS AND FOLLOWING SEAS. 

BT 
.

CQ CQ CQ,                                                                                     1 July 2003

     For    over   a  century,  Coast  Guard  Communicators have distinguished themselves in the service of their Nation and the maritime community by using a variety of communications systems to coordinate operations, provide timely weather and navigational information and respond to countless distress calls from around the world. The first Coast Guard communicators         were 
known as Radiomen but earned the nickname Sparks because of the electrical nature of early wireless equipment. “Sparks” also became the       term to describe the lightning bolts that became the emblem of the Radioman rating designator.

        Originally enlisting operators with a First Class Telegraph License, issued by the Department of Commerce, it wasn't until  late  1925 when a formal        Radioman   School  was established at Coast Guard Base Fort Trumball, in New London, Connecticut. Over the next half century, the school grew in size and scope, and was relocated several times, before arriving at its final location, in late 1971, at Coast Guard Training Center Petaluma California.
          In 1994, the Coast Guard changed the name of the Radioman rating to “Telecommunications Specialist”, in order to better reflect the job being performed by the communicators operating in the digital era.  Although  the   rate   had undergone a significant change, the traditional sparks remained the symbol of the Coast Guard Communicator for another decade.
     Today Coast Guard Communicators face a new change, as the Telecommunications Specialist rating becomes incorporated into two new ratings, Information System Technician and Operations Specialist. Along with the passing of the TC rating, we are also witnessing the retirement of the long held insignia for the Coast Guard Communicator - the “sparks” rating designator.
     On this historic day, we salute all those who have worn the Sparks and honor all those who have helped bring Coast Guard Communications into the 21st century.

73

VA

Quite a few stations QSL'd the NMC message. The following service message is the reply sent by KPH, located down the road from NMC (now closed, but operating as an "on the air" museum):

"Relieving of the Watch" presentation by member of OS class

RETIREMENT OF THE SPARKS

Posting of the Colors

Unveiling of the classes gift to advisor, C. S. Davis

​​​All graduating members of the class, though not having to pass any "morse code requirement" to graduate, received an "Honorary Membership" in the Coast Guard CW Operators Association.